Non-fiction , and Biographies-Memoirs & True Crime:Serial Killers ,Jack the Ripper you need to check out Part 2

Forgotten History: The Sultana Disaster


While the sinking of the Titanic is known all over the world, the Sultana disaster has been a footnote in American History.
In 1865, as the rest of the nation was distracted by the news that John Wilkes Booth had been caught and killed, one of the biggest maritime disasters of the world took place. On the murky waters of the Mississippi River, over a thousand lives were lost.
With such a huge casualty, this should have been front page news. Sadly, it was overshadowed by other events. Over 1800 brave soldiers died on the ill fated passenger steamer Sultana and the tragedy was known to very few.
This book is about what happened on the morning of April 27th, when soldiers who had just been liberated from the war camps stood on board the Sultana waiting eagerly to finally go home. It is a story of courage, greed and heartbreak that history forgot.
This book also contains the stories of the survivors and their comrades who were lost.

Here Is A Preview Of What You'll Learn...

• The Last Voyage of the Sultana.

• The Vicksburg Agreement.

• The Explosion .

• The Key Players.

• The Aftermath.

• WN Goodrich.

• Ann Annis.

• And much more...

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By March 1945, when Ben Robertson took to the skies above Japan in his B-29 Superfortress, the end of World War II in the Pacific seemed imminent.
But although American forces were closing in on its home islands, Japan refused to surrender, and American B-29s were tasked with hammering Japan to its knees with devastating bomb runs.
That meant flying low-altitude, night-time incendiary raids under threat of flak, enemy fighters, mechanical malfunction, and fatigue.
It may have been the beginning of the end, but just how soon the end would come - and whether Robertson and his crew would make it home - was far from certain

 

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World War 2

 

The Night Caller, The Nedlands Monster, and Eric Edgar Cooke, are the names used to describe one of the most brutal serial killers in Australian History. Over the space of 5 years, he not only murdered 8 people, he also attempted to murder 14 others, because he just wanted to hurt people. Was he crazy?

Nobody was safe from Eric Edgar Cooke. He was an opportunistic killer, selecting victims randomly. Whoever crossed his path during those hot humid nights would fall victim to his variety of killing methods. You were not safe in your homes, or walking down the road at night.

This serial killer biography will delve into the life and eventual execution of Eric Edgar Cooke, the last man hanged for murder in Perth, Western Australia. The deeds of Eric Edgar Cooke created fear and horror in the people of Perth. The true accounts from the survivors will show you how they lived through this Australian true crime.

If you are a lover of serial killers true crime, you will be enthralled by this investigative book. You will discover how it is that he could get away with his crimes for so long. Why is it that the detectives thought he was just a likeable rogue and petty thief? Discover how one man could change the lives of an entire town and become a bogeyman character for decades after his death. True crime murder doesn't get more complexing or bewildering as the story of Eric Edgar Cooke

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*Includes pictures
*Includes accounts of the coal wars from Mother Jones and other important participants
*Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading
*Includes a table of contents

"I'm not a humanitarian, I'm a hell-raiser." - Mother Jones

America is famous around the world for being the land of opportunity, and in many respects it has been for the nearly 400 years since its colonization. However, that opportunity has always come at some sort of price. In the times of wooden sailing vessels, men and women risked life and limb to sail across the Atlantic on small, creaking ships, but later, transportation became safer and easier with the invention of the coal powered steam engine. Over time, coal came to be used to power other advances in industry and technology, such as plants that produced steel and electricity. By the dawn of the 20th century, it seemed that there was nothing that the country could not accomplish, and that the future was brighter than ever.

But then, as always, there was the price. The vast majority of people burning coal to heat their farms and homes, and those watching skyscrapers rise over the city's landscape, likely never stopped to think about the price thousands of miners across the country were paying for these and other conveniences. Many never knew that coal had to be dug from the ground, typically in dark mines where dust poisoned miners' lungs, and that these men barely made enough to feed and clothe their families despite their hard days of toil. The people using the coal wanted it to be cheap, the miners wanted to earn enough money to survive, and the companies wanted to turn a profit.

In some ways, it seems safe to say that conflict was inevitable, but while there were numerous labor disputes during the early decades of the 20th century, few were as violent as the one that erupted in the hills of West Virginia in 1912. In fact, this conflict, which lasted about a decade, has rightly been called a war because men and women killed and were killed on its battlefields, culminating with the largest domestic insurrection since the Civil War in 1921. The coal companies' army was a hired force, professional gunfighters brought in to stop miners. But while they had the best training and the best weapons, they did not have Mother Jones - Mary Harris Jones - perhaps the most inspirational union organizer in United States history. With the help of Frank Keeney and other miners like him, Jones successfully brought the owners to their knees and won the right to unionize for miners who had only dreamed it might be possible. Now that a century has passed and mining is at least somewhat safer than it was, those working today can thank Jones and Keeney, not to mention the ones who died at the hand of hired guns, for what freedom they do have to fight for a living wage.

The West Virginia Coal Wars: The History of the 20th Century Conflict Between Coal Companies and Miners looks at the tumultuous fight on both sides of the lines. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the West Virginia mine wars like never before, in no time at all.

 

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Note: I actual got this because its about West Virginia and its my home state

 

First Blood for the Flying Tigers: Twelve Days After Pearl Harbor, a Band of American Mercenaries Took Their Revenge on the Empire of Japan (Tales of the Flying Tigers Book 1) by Daniel Ford

Enter the Tigers

When Japanese planes laid waste to Pearl Harbor on the morning of December 7, 1941, the United States had exactly one air combat unit on the continent of Asia. That was the 1st American Volunteer Group - sponsored by the White House, equipped and paid by a U.S. loan, but officially part of the Chinese Air Force. On December 20, this band of mercenaries won immortality over the city of Kunming. An expanded version, with new photographs, of the cover story for America in WWII magazine, December 2010.

The first of five articles and books included in the collection, Tales of the Flying Tigers.

 

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its free  on Amazon, but only 38 pages

I got it because the series is about The Flying Tigers and their one of my all time favorite planes from World War 2

 

In the 1970s and early '80s, southern California was shocked when dead boys began turning up with disturbing regularity alongside some of the picturesque state's most heavily traveled freeways.

Victims of sadistic torture, the dead boys and young men had been raped and strangled, and their untimely deaths were eventually attributed to the Freeway Killer, an elusive psychopath whose trail of death would go down in California history as one of the worst true crime stories in the country.

While the Freeway Killer ultimately turned out to be three different men, one of them was truck driver William Bonin, one of the most prolific and sadistic among American serial killers. Bonin usually preferred to work with an accomplice, and the lust killer and his cronies brutally raped and tortured his victims - Bonin loved the sounds of their screams - before strangling them and dumping them on the side of the road like garbage.

Bonin confessed to committing 21 murders in the span of just a year, although many experts believe he was responsible for the deaths of many more missing young men.

He was executed in 1996, and in this detailed serial killer biography, you'll learn the background that might offer some understanding of what makes a man go off the rails and become a deranged lust killer.

Of course, spine-tingling story of a man whose youngest victim was a 12-year-old who was waiting for a bus to take him to Disneyland might be one that causes you to sleep with the lights on for weeks after turning the final gruesome page.

 

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True Crime: Serial Killers 

 

From Ben Stevens, International Bestselling author of THE WHISTLER: A MURDERER'S TALE.

'We are barbarians - pitiless... The world can only be ruled by fear... '

So declared Adolf Hitler, the Fuhrer of Germany. A leader of millions, served by men and women of such appalling savagery, such merciless evil, that they make the words 'barbarians' and 'pitiless' seem all but redundant.

This book features 13 such 'servants of Hitler'. Included are names almost as infamous as Hitler's own - Heinrich Himmler, Joseph Goebbels - yet also the cowardly, but wholly sadistic Irma Grese (female guard at the Auschwitz concentration camp, in sole charge of some 30,000 inmates) and Bruno Tesch, one of the owners of the pest-control company Tesch and Stabenow, who amassed a fortune through the sale of the Zyclon-B gas crystals, used in the concentration camp gas chambers, to the Nazis.

 

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World War 2: Holocaust 

 

What does evil look like? Serial Killer Richard Ramirez certainly comes to mind...
Download FREE with Kindle Unlimited!


There are some people who travel so far beyond the pale of conventional morality that their actions almost seem like desperate works of fiction. Richard Ramirez is one such person, a Satan-worshipping drug addict who carried out one of America's most brutal and horrific crime sprees. He burgled, raped, and killed his way across California and left the authorities with nothing to chase. Named the Night Stalker by the press, he seemed like a ghost. Striking fear into the heart of every single person in the area, no one seemed safe from the actions of Richard Ramirez.

In this book, we will examine his most horrific crimes while attempting to explain exactly what could drive a man so far from the moral centre of society. A difficult upbringing, brain trauma, and a troubled domestic situation certainly added to his problems, but many of Ramirez's most damning actions were created entirely in his own twisted mind. This book will attempt to tell the story of the man who gouged eyes, scratched pentagrams, and butchered families. If there is any explanation for the crimes committed by the Night Stalker, then it likely lies between his past and his actions. In examining both, we will know the real person behind the murders.

Such is the nature of these ruthless, and cruel murders, the scenes depicted within will not be for the faint-hearted. There are few killers in American history who can come close to matching the vicious levels of violence inflicted by Ramirez during his wave of attacks. While names such as Dahmer and Gacy are remembered by the American public, the murders of the Night Stalker have long been forgotten. So read on and find out the truth behind one of America's most shocking and horrifying serial killers.

 

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While Wisconsin is now perhaps best known for its die-hard love of both the Green Bay Packers and its cheese, deep beneath the surface of Wisconsin history simmers a cesspool of nightmares that began before the term serial killer had been coined. The horror started when Ed Gein tried desperately to bring back his dead mother by first exhuming bodies, then by killing in order to harvest female body parts that he himself would wear.

His story sparked a nation's macabre fascination with American serial killers, though its bizarre tale of grave robbing and decorating with the dead meant that when other true crime stories surfaced from the state, no one was terribly surprised.

Ed Gein was among the first to undergo criminal profiling - was he transgender, a woman trapped in a man's body, or did he really just miss his mother? - but he would not be the last.

Wisconsin's infamous list of true crime serial killers includes the lonely Jeffrey Dahmer, who attempted science experiments in hopes of creating a sex slave to call his own, sex criminal David Spanbauer, who preferred raping little girls when he got the chance, and Walter Ellis, who preyed on prostitutes because he thought he would be able to get away with it. Turns out, he could, for more than a decade.

Wisconsin is full of secrets, and very bad men. This biography of four prolific serial killers steps into the heart of the state's madness, and is likely to make their nightmares yours, at least for a spine-tingling night or two, especially when you realize that what happens in the movies is sometimes horrifyingly real.

 

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Pedro Lopez liked hosting tea parties, with corpses as his guests. Daniel Camargo sought out virgins, and took both their virtues and their lives. Luis Garavito became sadistically violent after years of sexual abuse.

In Colombia in the 1970s, '80s and '90s, these three monsters cut a swath of terror across a country already ravaged by poverty as well as the casualties of the region's powerful drug cartels.

The three are among the most prolific serial killers in the world, and incredibly are believed to be responsible for nearly 1,000 murders of young boys and girls whose positions on the lower rungs of society's ladder made them especially vulnerable.

These true accounts of Colombia's most sadistic of sex criminals reveal the awful price they forced the most innocent of victims to pay when their childhood betrayals turned to uncontrollable rage.

These chilling true crime stories are the stuff of nightmares, and if you're not left shattered by the sheer number of victims - you'll reel when you learn how little time these madmen served for destroying the lives of so many families already struggling with hardship.

It's a serial killer biography that will not only leave you stunned, but also wondering if the infamous Pedro Lopez - released after serving less than 30 years - is still alive somewhere, holding macabre tea parties with his young victims

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True Crime:Serial Killers 

 

Includes pictures
*Includes contemporary accounts of the investigation written in newspapers and by investigators
*Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading
*Includes a table of contents

"I keep on hearing the police have caught me but they wont fix me just yet. I have laughed when they look so clever and talk about being on the right track... How can they catch me now. I love my work and want to start again. You will soon hear of me with my funny little games." - Excerpt from one of the letters believed to have been written by Jack the Ripper

When one hears the term "Victorian," many images come to mind. For some, the term conjures up visions of lace and gloves and delicate fans. Others think of tight corsets and even tighter morals. Others, swayed perhaps by one too many British costume dramas, envision gentle elegance and long lost beauty. Naturally, few people think of multiple dead bodies cast about in the streets or dark bedrooms, most mutilated to a shocking degree, and yet, those tragic images played a significant role not only in late Victorian London but ever since. In 1888 and 1889, a killer stalked the dark backstreets of the city through the notoriously overcrowded and crime-ridden Whitechapel district, murdering young women and then cutting their bodies up like a butcher.

There have been a countless number of serial killers throughout history, and certainly more prolific ones, but the timing, circumstances, and unsolved nature of the case continue to make Jack the Ripper the most famous serial killer in history. The murders came at a time when media coverage could be both more acute and more widespread, and it allowed the public a closer look into how police agencies operated at the time, exposing both their strengths and shortcomings. Of course, the lack of modern forensics hamstrung the investigators in the late 19th century, and while the police file for the case was extensive and active for several years, much of the evidence disappeared from the file without explanation, possibly as souvenirs. Despite the fact the police interviewed thousands and considered hundreds of suspects, they were never able to arrest anyone for the murders.

The intense media coverage also likely played a role in both the actual murderer and would-be copycats and pranksters sending hundreds of letters to police claiming to be Jack the Ripper. It's also indisputable that the use of a precise modus operandi, the serial killer being given a nickname, and the taunting letters sent to police all influenced subsequent serial killers and the way they were covered. Whether it's the Zodiac Killer, the Son of Sam, or the Boston Strangler, the antecedent of all 20th century and 21st century killers remains Jack the Ripper.

The Jack the Ripper case continues to fascinate historians and amateur sleuths so much that people have dubbed themselves Ripperologists, and since nobody knows for sure who the killer was, every aspect of the crimes is up for discussion, down to who the actual victims of the Ripper were and whether there was actually more than one Ripper. In addition to considering so many suspects, the police were only certain that 5 of the victims (the "canonical five") were killed by Jack the Ripper, but there were at least 11 documented murders over the course of several years, and today those are called the Whitechapel murders. Even in the 19th century, authorities were debating how many of the 11 were the work of the Ripper, and as the murders have been compared and contrasted for nearly 130 years, the debate continues.

The Search for Jack the Ripper: The History of the Police Investigation into the Whitechapel Murders examines the attempts to identify and arrest Jack the Ripper. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the investigation of the famous serial killer like never before.

 

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got a copy of it when Amazon had it for free

True Crime: Serial Killers 

Note: I love to read anything that has to do with Jake the Ripper

 

Includes pictures
*Includes investigators' accounts and newspaper accounts about the crimes and suspects
*Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading
*Includes a table of contents

“I keep on hearing the police have caught me but they wont fix me just yet. I have laughed when they look so clever and talk about being on the right track…How can they catch me now. I love my work and want to start again. You will soon hear of me with my funny little games.” – Excerpt from a letter widely believed to be from Jack the Ripper
When one hears the term “Victorian,” many images come to mind. For some, the term conjures up visions of lace and gloves and delicate fans. Others think of tight corsets and even tighter morals. Others, swayed perhaps by one too many British costume dramas, envision gentle elegance and long lost beauty.

Naturally, few people think of multiple dead bodies cast about in the streets or dark bedrooms, most mutilated to a shocking degree, and yet, those tragic images played a significant role not only in late Victorian London but ever since. In 1888 and 1889, a killer stalked the dark backstreets of the city through the notoriously overcrowded and crime-ridden Whitechapel district, murdering young women and then cutting their bodies up like a butcher.

The Jack the Ripper case continues to fascinate historians and amateur sleuths so much that people have dubbed themselves Ripperologists, and since nobody knows for sure who the killer was, every aspect of the crimes is up for discussion, down to who the actual victims of the Ripper were and whether there was actually more than one Ripper. In addition to considering so many suspects, the police were only certain that 5 of the victims (the “canonical five”) were killed by Jack the Ripper, but there were at least 11 documented murders over the course of several years, and today those are called the Whitechapel murders. Even in the 19th century, authorities were debating how many of the 11 were the work of the Ripper, and as the murders have been compared and contrasted for nearly 130 years, the debate continues.

While the killer has no doubt been dead for decades, there is still no way to know for sure who he was. That is not to say that there are not suspects; in fact, there are literally hundreds of them, from virtually every walk of life, including a prince, several knights, a policeman, a number of surgeons or surgical students, a few women, and a great many violent criminals. The list is so extensive that it is nearly impossible to narrow down and still be comprehensive.

The first group of suspects that deserve the closest review are those who the police themselves suspected, back during the dreadful days in which the murders were committed. Like all the most likely candidates, they were men who had some sort of medical or butchering background and thus knew how to use a big knife well. Some had weak alibis, and others had none at all, but none were ever tried, indicating there was not enough evidence to arrest any of them.
Another group that bears another look are those men who were considered viable suspects by the press and the public, for while these men escaped police attention, there was still something in their lives that made the common people consider them criminals capable of dastardly deeds. In some cases, it was a matter of bigotry, as people turned on those that were different from themselves, either in their ethnicity, sexual preferences, or religion. In other instances, the press itself felt that that it had found out something that the police had either missed or chosen to ignore. Some suspects has a more recent origin, consisting of people who have been accused by various authors long after the fact. This list is by far the most extensive and also the least viable. This is where the sensational stories come in, of princes and royal cover-up, of policemen who knew the killer to be one of their own.

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True Crime:

Note: Love to read anything about Jack the Ripper

 

Jack the Ripper: A Life of Crime | The True Story of Jack the Ripper (Short Reads Historical Biographies of Famous People)

He was his era’s most wanted man, leaving behind him a string of mutilated victims that terrified the world. Yet despite a wealth of tantalizing evidence—eyewitnesses who saw him with his victims, his taunting letters to police, and forensic evidence gathered from the dead—he has never been conclusively unmasked.

Alexander Kennedy gives a compact, readable overview of the Ripper saga, examining the killings from every side. Here we experience the desperate race of police to stop the Ripper before he strikes again, and the role of newspapers in shaping the Ripper legend. We look at each of the so-called “canonical” murders, and also the possibility that the Ripper might have killed more women than generally realized. And then we chase down the many answers to the most burning question of all: Whodunit? Both novices and hardcore “Ripperologists” will appreciate Alexander Kennedy’s fresh, insightful take on history’s most iconic killer.

"One day men will look back and say I gave birth to the twentieth century" - Jack the Ripper

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True Crime:Serial Killers

 

Jack the Ripper - sailor, soldier, butcher, barber, black magician, blackmailer, doctor, docker, artist, poet, religious zealot, ruffian, royal, victim, villain... Jack the Ripper, he was all of these things and none of them. A faceless blank slate for a century of researchers to etch their elaborate theories upon.

We all think we know the story of the worlds most renowned serial killer, yet the real story has been lost in over a century of lies, misunderstandings and half-truths.

In "Murder Tales: Jack the Ripper" H. N. Lloyd explores the complicated history surrounding the myth of Jack the Ripper. He explores with his trademark dry wit and eye for detail the evidence for a medical ripper, the evidence of the eyewitnesses, the methods and failures of the police investigation, the obsession that the crimes ignited at the time and today, finally he walks us through the suspects and peculiar theories that have so obscured the truth for over a century.

A must read for fans of the Murder Tales series, die-hard ripperologist or those who are risking the obsession of the Ripper for the very first time.

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True Crime: Serial Killers

 

Gille de Rais has been described as one of the most horrific serial killer of the Middle Ages or was he? Revisiting Gilles de Rais crimes.

La Roche-Bernard, France. September, 1438

Peronne Loessart knew that she should feel honored, both for herself and on her young son's behalf. But she was still in a state of unease bordering on fear.

The Baron de Rais and his entourage were in her town, stopping at the hotel of Jean Colin, which was in the immediate neighborhood of Madame Loessart's home. One of the Baron's men, a man named Poitou, had spied her ten-year-old son and approached her about engaging the boy as his page.

Young Loessart often drew such attention. He was an uncommonly beautiful child, with golden hair and expressive blue eyes. But this was the first time that he had come to the notice of a potential patron.

Poitou, whose real name was Étienne Corrillaut, went to Madame Loessart and offered her four pounds for the boy's services, with an added bonus of one hundred sous for a new dress. He also promised to continue the child's education at a prestigious institution.

Although distressed at the thought of being parted from her son, Madame Loessart finally agreed. She knew that he had limited opportunities for advancement in La Roche-Bernard. Poitou also gave her his word that the boy would be well provided for.

She believed it. Gilles de Rais was the Marshal of France, a great man who had helped Jeanne d'Arc bring about the victory at Orléans. A regal escort preceded him wherever he went and trumpeters announced his presence at each destination. His ostentatious display of wealth and pageantry turned heads and inspired both awe and adoration. Now her son would have the chance to benefit from such glory.

A pony was purchased from the hotel owner for the boy to ride, and the Baron's entourage left for his castle at Machecoul the following day. There was probably a tearful goodbye, accompanied by promises to send messages and see each other soon.

Despite the excellent opportunity she appeared to be giving her son, Madame Loessart remained anxious. Perhaps separation anxiety was taking hold. Maybe the rumors that had been circulating lately now seemed more plausible. Whatever the reason, she suddenly ran after the departing party.

One of the Baron's servants intercepted the distraught woman and held her back, reminding her that a bargain had been struck. Gilles de Rais did not respond to her pleas. Instead, he spoke to the servant restraining her.

"He (the child) is well chosen. He is as beautiful as an angel."

Finally Madame Loessart calmed down, and the Baron's party resumed its journey.

Two years passed. The Baron's servants passed through the village once during that time, although young Loessart was not with them. On demanding news of her son, the men informed her that the boy was either at Tiffauges or Pouzauges. The truth was that he was long dead.

My Rating: 5 stars

got a copy of it when Amazon had it for free

True Crime: Serial Killers

My review: Here

link:http://labyrinthofstories.booklikes.com/post/1467653/described-as-one-of-the-most-horrific-serial-killer-of-the-middle-ages-or-was-he

 

Charles Manson and the Manson Family Murders - A Mineography

Responsible for the Tate - La Bianca murder spree over a two-night span back in 1969, the Manson family quickly became embroiled in media attention. Charles Manson, Charles 'Tex' Watson, Susan 'Sexy Sadie' Atkins, Leslie Van Houghten, Patricia Kremwinkel and Linda Kasabian, as well as Paul Watkins; all members of the infamous Manson Family would soon become household names.

Charles Manson... some would call him brilliant. Brilliant for having had the ability to brainwash those who would later become infamously known all over the world as the Manson Family, and coerce them into committing some of the most brutal slayings in modern times. Charles Manson is a sociopath, a psychopath. But brilliant? I think not. As a matter of fact, there is nothing at all brilliant about the man.

Murder is one of the most brutal crimes anyone could ever commit, a crime for which could lead to decades behind bars, a life sentence, or the death penalty for the person responsible - if and when they are caught. Murder is a crime of intention, and often times it is premeditated, resulting in the untimely death of the innocent. This crime falls under the category of criminal homicide. Based on both federal and state laws, murder and homicide are considered among the most complex of criminal behaviors.

The reason that certain people commit murder has long been the subject of intense debate and extreme controversy. Investigators often find themselves clueless when investigating the motivation behind certain murders, and what drives one person to kill another. They wonder if the person has a conscious, or even feels badly for their actions. However, despite the fact that there is a single victim model, there are also individuals who are capable of killing not just once, but multiple times. Some would say that once a person has killed without any legal justification, and without remorse, he is without a soul, and often times they don't believe their actions to be wrong. This is the basic mindset of a murderer, a serial killer, and a mass murderer.

Most normal people are shocked and become deeply affected when a murder is committed in their town or neighborhood, especially if the victim is an acquaintance, a close friend or a relative. And so the search for justice begins, and when a suspect is tried and convicted, often times they will plea for forgiveness, and throw themselves at the mercy of the court. However the facts are, that once the evidence is presented and the suspect(s) have been sentenced to death or to a life behind bars, it will never change the reality that the lives affected, can never be fully righted, and the relatives and friends of the victim(s) must accept this fact and desperately try to move on with their lives.

Charles Miles Maddox, aka Charlie Manson. This is the story of Charles Manson, the man, and his infamous murder family, aka The Manson Family.

 

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True Crime

 

In the summer of 1969, in Los Angeles, a series of brutal, seemingly random murders captured headlines across America. A famous actress (and her unborn child), an heiress to a coffee fortune, a supermarket owner and his wife were among the seven victims. A thin trail of circumstances eventually tied the Tate-LeBianca murders to Charles Manson, a would-be pop singer of small talent living in the desert with his "family" of devoted young women and men. What was his hold over them? And what was the motivation behind such savagery? In the public imagination, over time, the case assumed the proportions of myth. The murders marked the end of the sixties and became an immediate symbol of the dark underside of that era.
Vincent Bugliosi was the prosecuting attorney in the Manson trial, and this book is his enthralling account of how he built his case from what a defense attorney dismissed as only "two fingerprints and Vince Bugliosi." The meticulous detective work with which the story begins, the prosecutor's view of a complex murder trial, the reconstruction of the philosophy Manson inculcated in his fervent followers... these elements make for a true crime classic. ?Helter Skelter ?is not merely a spellbinding murder case and courtroom drama but also, in the words of ?The New Republic?, a "social document of rare importance."
50 pages of black-and-white photographs

My rating: 5 stars

own a paperback copy of it that I got from Books A Million

True Crime

Actual have read and re read it, and have the first movie they ever made about him

 

 

The Shocking True Crime Stories of the 12 Worst Serial Killers in American History

David Berkowitz: Known as the “Son of Sam,” Berkowitz was a deeply disturbed young man who prowled the streets of New York dispensing death with his .44 caliber revolver.

William Bonin: One of a trio of deadly psychopaths who trawled the freeways of Southern California during the late 70’s and early 80’s. Bonin was a depraved child killer who abducted, raped and tortured more than 20 teenaged boys.

The Boston Strangler: Albert De Salvo took the fall but most experts agree that he was not the Strangler. So who was the real killer? And how did he get away with the series of brutal murders that so terrified the citizens of Boston?

Ted Bundy: Charming, intelligent and lethal, Bundy is America’s most notorious serial killer, a deadly fiend who cut a swathe of destruction across the country, raping, killing and committing necrophilia on his young victims.

Dean Corll: Along with two willing teenaged accomplices, Corll orchestrated what was at the time the biggest murder spree in American history, raping torturing and killing at least 25 young boys.

Jeffrey Dahmer: Hideously depraved killer who preyed on young homosexual men in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, cannibalizing them and conducting bizarre experiments on their bodies.

Albert Fish: He looked like a frail old man, but Albert Fish was actually a psychotic child killer and torturer, with a taste for human flesh.

John Wayne Gacy: Cold-hearted killer who raped, tortured and strangled at least 33 young men, burying their bodies in the crawlspace of his Chicago house.

Randy Kraft: The least well known of California’s three “Freeway Killers.” And yet Kraft was both the most prolific and the most depraved, responsible for the torture killings of as many as 67 young men.

Dennis Rader: Known as the “BTK Killer” (after his M.O.: Bind, Torture, Kill) Radar held the citizens of Wichita, Kansas in a state of fear for over 30 years, during which time he claimed 10 known victims.

Richard Ramirez: A satanic burglar who went by the terrifying sobriquet, “The Night Stalker,” Ramirez raped, battered, shot and stabbed his victims during a bloody reign of terror in 1980’s Los Angeles.

Gary Ridgeway: As the horrific “Green River Killer,” Ridgeway engaged the Washington police in a deadly game of cat and mouse, claiming more that 60 victims over two decades.

My rating:5 stars

have a copy of it on my Nook app

True Crime: Serial Killers

need to put up a review of it